Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Help Communities in Uganda Build Water Harvesting Systems

With so much of the media focusing on political candidates and other “news of the day,” critical news about the basic struggle for survival — often gets overlooked. But unfortunately whether the media decides to report on these issues or not, the events continue to unfold — and lives continue to be at risk.


Dear John,

With so much of the media focusing on political candidates and other “news of the day,” critical news about the basic struggle for survival — often gets overlooked. But unfortunately whether the media decides to report on these issues or not, the events continue to unfold — and lives continue to be at risk.

I’m sure you’re aware of the climate changes which are affecting farming and food production around the world. As weather patterns change here in America, midwestern states have seen a tremendous impact on the ability to grow food cost effectively. But the changes are not limited to the U.S., other countries are being affected as well.

Recently, I received a letter from Fr. Godwin Muhangi — a missionary working in Kabwohe, a town in southwestern Uganda in East Africa. Fr. Godwin is in charge of St. Mukasa Preparatory Seminary. With more than 100 young men currently enrolled in the school, it plays a critical role in training missionaries who will serve throughout East Africa.

“The need for St. Mukasa, the education it offers as well as the hope it brings to the people of the community — is evident in the lives of those who come here,” Fr. Godwin writes. “It is vital that the school continue its work, but the challenges we face are becoming greater every month.”

“The need for water in Uganda is critical. We are in the midst of our worst drought in more than 40 years,” he explains, “and for this region of the world, that’s saying a lot. Not only is water needed for farming and home gardens (which small families use for subsistence), but water is needed for the livestock. We especially need water for drinking and cooking.”

“Right now — as the drought worsens — a lot of people must purchase their water from water suppliers. Because our school needs so much water to care for the needs of our students,

teachers, staff and others, that has become very expensive. We simply can no longer afford to do that.”

“Our plan is to construct a water harvesting system. Such a system would allow us to save whatever rainwater that falls and the store it in large plastic reservoirs. The water would then be purified and used as needed. A water harvesting system is critical if we’re going to have the water we need!”

Water harvesting and storage tanks are desperately needed not only at Fr. Godwin’s school in southwestern Uganda, but in communities throughout East Africa. Water harvesting is an ideal way for those in need to be able to save precious rainwater which would otherwise be soaked into the ground and lost.

Since the cost of constructing just one water harvesting system is about $8,300 — we need to raise at least $41,500 to help five communities get the water they need.

My friend, time and again, you have helped us provide basic living necessities such as food, water and medicine to men, women and children in need. Please … can we count on your help again?

In his letter, Fr. Godwin provided a breakdown of the items needed for the project. They include pipes, large plastic tanks (which will hold thousands of gallons of water), faucets, valves, cement, bricks — the list goes on. I share this with you so that you will know that the funds we are raising will only buy the materials needed. The people in the local community of Kabwohe will do the actual construction themselves! They are willing to do the work — they only ask for our help in making the project happen. God bless you for whatever you can send.