Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Provide a Water Tank in Mbarara, Uganda

During the past decade or so, we’ve seen the weather go through some crazy fluctuations. Wild storms which have developed into hurricanes and tornadoes have wreaked havoc across the United States. Recently, though, especially within the last several years, the situation has gotten even worse. As I write this letter to you, the temperature is 96 degrees — in Alaska!


Dear John,

During the past decade or so, we’ve seen the weather go through some crazy fluctuations. Wild storms which have developed into hurricanes and tornadoes have wreaked havoc across the United States. Recently, though, especially within the last several years, the situation has gotten even worse. As I write this letter to you, the temperature is 96 degrees — in Alaska!

Whether we can agree on what is causing the change, most people will agree the earth’s climate is indeed changing. And it isn’t happening just here in the U.S.

Massive glaciers in the Arctic and Antarctic regions are melting at an accelerated rate. And in regions such as East Africa, long seasons of rain — which the local population has depended on for their livelihood and survival for centuries — have nearly disappeared. Our missionaries working in the area are witnessing this first-hand … and they are reaching out to us for help.

Recently, I received a letter from Fr. Rudi Lehnertz — one of our missionaries who is living and working in Kampala, Uganda, in East Africa. Fr. Rudi keeps in touch with us to make sure the projects which we fund are genuine. His endorsement and judgement are incredibly valuable!

As I stated before, Uganda (and indeed much of East Africa) is in the midst of an on-going drought. The lack of rainfall is having a devastating effect on the entire nation. Because of the water shortage, crops such as maize (corn) and beans which were planted in late spring are stunted and drying up. Farmers are plowing under their crops — knowing that they will not receive a harvest this year. The farmers say the unpredictable climate changes are the main problem affecting them. They used to know the seasons, but now they plant in hope that rain will come. Lately, though, the rains have not fallen. That is why Fr. Rudi contacted me.

You see, while water is essential for growing crops, the people of Uganda desperately need water for themselves as well.

“There is a primary school — the Burungamo Primary School — at a mission in Mbarara, Uganda. It is in the Isingiro District of western Uganda,” his letter explains. The western region of Uganda has been hardest hit by the recent drought.

“The school has been operating since 2006,” his letter continues, “but they do not have a water catchment or water harvesting system. Because of the long drought, most wells have become dry. Creeks and rivers have all but dried up as well. When that happens, everyone is desperately searching for water. Operating a school in this environment is difficult enough. Imagine trying to do it without a supply of water.”

“The school urgently needs a means for catching and harvesting any rainwater that falls. They have come to us for help. They have already cleared the land for the placement of the water storage tanks, but they need help purchasing the tanks themselves as well as the pipes, valves, faucets, concrete and other materials which are part of the construction of such a system.”

“The community is willing to do as much as it can toward building the water harvesting system,
but they are poor. If they are going to have water, they need our help!”

My friend, I am praying that there is some way you can help. The Burungamo Primary School will need at least a 40,000 litre tank (a little more than 10,000 gallons) to provide for the children and the staff. But there are other missions asking for help with their water projects as well. That is why I am writing to you.

You have been so faithful in your support of our missions and those in need, but I would not be asking you if there were some other way. I am praying that we can raise at least $45,000 to be used to help the children at the school in Mbarara as well as to be used for the other water projects in our missions throughout Africa. I really do not know how much you can send. I only ask that for this especially critical need — you be as generous as possible. No one (especially young school children) should have to suffer from life-threatening thirst. God bless you for whatever you can send!