Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Help Provide Food and Clothes to Orphans in Kenya

If you’re like me, you’re old enough to remember the television commercial which aired more than twenty years ago. The visual image was of a child — obviously living in poverty — who seemed to have little hope for the future. As the child looked into the bleakness of his life, a man’s voice said, “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” It was a powerful message!


Dear Friends,

If you’re like me, you’re old enough to remember the television commercial which aired more than twenty years ago. The visual image was of a child — obviously living in poverty — who seemed to have little hope for the future. As the child looked into the bleakness of his life, a man’s voice said, “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” It was a powerful message!

All these years later, I still remember that commercial — and those words. And as my work here at the Missionaries of Africa has continued and broadened, that phrase has continued to have an impact on me. More significantly, though, now — with all that I have seen through my work with orphans and neglected children in Africa — I would change that statement to read: “a LIFE is a terrible thing to waste.”

Why? Because in many areas of East Africa — that is exactly what is happening.

Recently, I received a letter from Sr. Agatha Muthoni — a nun who is living in the Taita Region of Kenya (in East Africa) — about 150 miles northwest of Mombasa. There, Sr. Agatha is in charge of a program that reaches out to some of the children living in Kenya who have lost their parents as a result of the HIV epidemic . . . among other tragedies.

In war torn countries, we see so many lives shattered and innocent children suffering from the loss of their parents. As I write, this is happening in places such as Syria, Sudan, and in parts of the Congo. We as Missionaries of Africa are not big enough to help all who ask for help, but through people like Sr. Agatha, we try to help some of them.

“The children need food, medicine, clothing, and education,” Sr. Agatha writes, “but obtaining those necessities is a process. We are doing as much as we can to give the children what they need — but we cannot do it alone. Our Sisters, among others, have also established a center in Voi — the region’s largest town — as an outreach to those boys and girls most in need.

There, we are teaching the children and helping them to develop skills which will enable them to eventually get jobs and earn a living for themselves.”

“Since some of the boys and girls are very young and cannot work, not every child is ready to be on his or her own. But for those children who are getting older — if they are to survive — it is essential that they learn skills.”

“The local community has been providing clothing for the children,” Sr. Agatha continues, “but since the people here are very poor, we still need help with the cost of food and education. Is there some way you can help these children?”

As I read Sr. Agatha’s letter, I could not help but think about the overwhelming number of orphaned children who need help! Since there are so many, does helping 100 or even 1,000 children really make a difference? But then I imagined: What if just ONE of those children was mine? And if something happened to me — and my child became an orphan — wouldn’t I want someone reaching out to help my child?

My friend, I am praying that we can raise at least $35,000 for the children of Sr. Agatha’s mission in Voi, Kenya, as well as for our other missions in Africa. Please know that no matter what the size of your gift — whether it is a lot or a little — what is most important that we do something. Yes, there are a lot of boys and girls who need help, but together we can help them one child at a time.

For everything that you continue to do for our missions, our missionaries, and for those who cannot do for themselves, thank you. You and your loved ones remain in my prayers

Your Missionary Friend,
Denis P. Pringle
Director of Development