Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Support Vocational Education in Uganda

They’re on the cutting edge of making huge strides to fix a very basic problem in Mubende, Uganda. That’s what Mother Gerine Vocational Institute is all about – finding a solution and making progress.

When Sister Maria Immacolata wrote asking for help I sensed her passion that this vocational school held the answer to making a real difference in the lives of its students. One student wrote the following on Facebook: “This institution is profoundly built on faith and respect of God. Its ultimate importance is to boost up and enrich the minds of the students with knowledge – to expand our minds.”


Our vocational school teaches skills to the youth, especially girls, to help them become more self-reliant – thus helping Uganda solve its problem of rampart unemployment.

Sister Maria Immacolata Bray

They’re on the cutting edge of making huge strides to fix a very basic problem in Mubende, Uganda. That’s what Mother Gerine Vocational Institute is all about – finding a solution and making progress.

When Sister Maria Immacolata wrote asking for help I sensed her passion that this vocational school held the answer to making a real difference in the lives of its students. One student wrote the following on Facebook: “This institution is profoundly built on faith and respect of God. Its ultimate importance is to boost up and enrich the minds of the students with knowledge – to expand our minds.”

The school opened in 1995 on land given by a parish. The local people provided the labor to actually build the school. Then they started the hard work of sensitizing parents that vocational training was extremely important if their children wanted to climb out of unemployment. Students could graduate with certificates in tailoring, cosmetology, or computer sciences – all skills needed by prospective employers.

Right now we must raise $28,000 to keep the school operating. They desperately need to purchase equipment like sewing machines, buttonhole machines, hair dryers, salon chairs, computers, and books. You’ve been so very helpful – going the extra mile with us to change the world one step at a time. I hope I can count on you today – and, together, we can ease Sister Maria Immacolata’s concern about financial support.

Vocational education tends to be a hands-on education rather than heavily academic. For too long there has been a stigma attached to this type of education. Globally there was a tendency to associate this training with the low social classes. Parents dream to have the children graduate with a university degree not a certificate from a vocational institution. But right now in Uganda, educators need to fill the job market with employees who have well trained basic skill.

Mother Gerine Vocational Training Institute students go out into the world self-assured that they know their trade and are ready to provide excellent service to an employer. Some graduates have started their businesses while others come back to teach at the Institute. These are students who work very hard at learning a trade and do not hesitate to put it to use. They are graduates who see a new world – a new future. They are no longer locked into unemployment. They’ve studied, been tested, and now shout out: “Here I come ready to make my contribution!”

As I was writing this I was wondering what we could do better to support people we know who are skilled in a selected trade. Maybe it starts with saying thank you to your barber or greeting your lawn mowers with a smile and bottle of water, or telling your tailor how people loved your new suit that fits just right. When we do this we create an environment of love and care – our message is one of appreciation and hope.

Please pray for the Sisters at Mother Gerine and all our missionaries in Africa. Your gift of prayer helps to support their commitment. And I hope I can count on you to be as generous as possible to help Sister Maria Immacolata.

Thank you for your continued generosity!

 

Your Missionary Friend,

Denis P. Pringle

Director of Development