Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Supply Power and Water for Orphans in Tanzania

I hope that you are well and that you and your loved ones are enjoying good health. Our missionaries continue to remember you in their daily prayers and Masses — for it is because of your kindness that they are able to work and serve among the poor and those in need. As I have shared with you so often — and it is a message from the heart: without your generosity, we would not be able to touch the lives of so many! And again, I am writing to you on their behalf.

 


“Water, water everywhere, Nor any drop to drink. ”

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I hope that you are well and that you and your loved ones are enjoying good health. Our missionaries continue to remember you in their daily prayers and Masses — for it is because of your kindness that they are able to work and serve among the poor and those in need. As I have shared with you so often — and it is a message from the heart: without your generosity, we would not be able to touch the lives of so many! And again, I am writing to you on their behalf.

One of the Sisters holding two of the youngest orphans.

When I first read the letter I received from a missionary Sister working in Tanzania, East Africa, I have to admit that the above quote was one of the first things that came to mind. The quote is from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” And while the setting of the poem is the middle of the ocean (sailors surrounded by sea water that they cannot drink) — quite the opposite of the mission in Tanzania — there are similarities. Please let me explain.

Sr. Maria Goreth Ulaya is the director of the St. Martin de Porres Orphanage in the city of Sumbawangam in western Tanzania. “St. Martin de Porres Orphanage Center serves about 70 children — sometimes more,” Sr. Maria writes. “The children range in age from newborns to six year olds. Many of the boys and girls became orphans when their parents died from diseases such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, as well as from drinking contaminated water.”

Some of the babies living in the orphanage.

“We try to provide the children with whatever they need for nurturing and good health. People from the community donate clothing, medicine, and food as often as they can. We also grow our own vegetables and raise some of our own livestock. Not long ago, we were also able to raise enough funds to drill a borehole well for the orphanage,” she continues. “Since we are in a very dry area, having a reliable source of safe drinking water is critical — especially in caring for the small children. Once the well became operational, though, the costs of electricity began to rise — making it extremely expensive to pump the water. Additionally, we can sometimes lose electricity for extended periods of time . . . meaning that we also lose access to fresh water.”

“Our hope is to construct a solar power system that will enable us to have a continuous source of electricity for pumping water from the well. We do believe that this will provide us with the reliable source of safe drinking water that our children desperately need. I pray that you can help us.”

Along with her letter, Sr. Maria included a listing of the materials that need to be purchased for constructing the solar pump and power supply. The list includes cables, wiring, electrical switches, solar panels, pumps and more. I do hope that together you and I can help them get the water they need!

Children in the orphanage kindergarten!

I am also hoping that you will reach out to those in your own community who may need help getting clean water to drink. One way that you could help would be to distribute bottles of drinking water to those who are homeless! Many of us who have never experienced homelessness don’t realize how precious a bottle of water can be to those who have none. You could also donate jugs of water to your local food pantry. Again, it is something that many of us often overlook when reaching out to those in need. I am also hoping that you will help the children in Tanzania.

Is there some amount you could send to help provide a reliable source of drinking water for the children and the Sisters at St. Martin de Porres Orphanage? While my hope is that we will raise at least $30,000 to support this mission and our other projects in East Africa, please know that any donation you can send — large or small — will help us reach out to those who are struggling just to have the basic necessities needed to survive. God bless you for your continued support.

 

Your Missionary Friend,

Denis P. Pringle
Director of Development