Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Give Orphans in Kenya Skills Needed to Survive

Recently I received a letter from Sr. Esther Akinyi. Sr. Esther works at the St. Francis Technical Training Institute in Asumbi, Kenya, in East Africa. The Technical Training Institute was created more than 30 years ago by a group of missionary Sisters who have dedicated themselves to helping widows, orphans and those most vulnerable in society.


“Teach children how they should live, and they will remember it all their life.”

Proverbs 22:6

As we begin another year, I want to once again take this opportunity to thank you for all that you do for our missionaries and those we serve throughout Africa. For over 150 years, we have been ministering to the needs of Africa’s poor — and as our work continues — we remain committed to helping alleviate the poverty and deprivation that are still widespread in Africa. It is also worth noting that in recent decades, we have found one of the most effective ways to do this is by funding projects that foster self-reliance and human dignity.

But our ability to help those who are working to help themselves is only made possible by your financial support. That is why I am writing this letter to you.

Students waiting for their noon meal.

Recently I received a letter from Sr. Esther Akinyi. Sr. Esther works at the St. Francis Technical Training Institute in Asumbi, Kenya, in East Africa. The Technical Training Institute was created more than 30 years ago by a group of missionary Sisters who have dedicated themselves to helping widows, orphans and those most vulnerable in society.

“The roots of our training program go back to the 1950s,” Sr. Esther writes, “when we began teaching young women how to sew, knit, and cook. In 1987, we adapted our program to meet the changing needs of young African women in society.”

“Girls and boys come to the Institute to learn skills to help them survive. Many of the children have lost their parents to diseases such as AIDS and malaria — so these young people need to learn skills in order to survive.”

A kitchen at the Training Institute

“Today we train young people to work in food service, small businesses, beauty salons, garment making, carpentry and other areas. Some of our young people even go on to attend college training programs. Whatever level they are at when they finish our Training Institute, they at least have the skills needed to participate in the work force — to earn money to support themselves.”

“The local community supports us as much as they can,” she continues, “providing nearly 60% of the food that the children need while they are living here. They have also helped repair the roofs of the dormitories but we still have a need for food and water for the children. Our hope is that you can help us purchase beans, rice, fruit, vegetables, sugar, and other food items to last for the next few months as well as help us purchase two large tanks for storing drinking water (for use during the dry season). Whatever you can do will help us give these children hope for their future!”

Student building at the Training Institute

Africa’s children face incredible difficulties! And as I read Sr. Esther’s letter, I could not help but think of the difficulties children in our own communities face — especially homeless children — and how they need our help as well. With this in mind, I hope you might consider providing support for homeless children in your own community by volunteering to serve food at a local soup kitchen a few hours a month. You could also offer to cook a casserole to be served at a community shelter or soup kitchen. What a great way to let those in need know that you care!

Will you also send a donation to help provide food and clean water for the children at Sr. Esther’s mission in Kenya? While our hope is to raise at least $32,500 for this and other missions throughout East Africa, please know that whatever donation you send will be used to continue providing life-changing care for those in need. God bless you for your generosity.

 

Your Missionary Friend,

Denis P. Pringle
Director of Development