Serving God's People in Africa since 1868

Provide a Community with Clean Water

“If only 7 percent of the 2 billion Christians in the world would care for a single orphan, . . . we would be amazed by just how much we could change the world.”

Happy New Year! I pray that your holidays were filled with joy, peace, and a chance to be surrounded by the loving presence of family and friends. As I write these words to you, I am thinking that others have probably said or written the same thing to you recently. It’s funny: when we talk about the holidays, few adults ever say: “So tell me how many great gifts you got during the holidays.” Instead, we focus on the importance of family. We realize that the most important thing in life is the love we share with one another — love that comes from family and friends.


“If only 7 percent of the 2 billion Christians in the world would care for a single orphan. . . we would be amazed by just how much we could change the world.”

Steven Curtis Chapman

Dear Mr. Doe,

Happy New Year! I pray that your holidays were filled with joy, peace, and a chance to be surrounded by the loving presence of family and friends. As I write these words to you, I am thinking that others have probably said or written the same thing to you recently. It’s funny: when we talk about the holidays, few adults ever say: “So tell me how many great gifts you got during the holidays.” Instead, we focus on the importance of family. We realize that the most important thing in life is the love we share with one another — love that comes from family and friends.

Children understand that as well . . . even at a very early age.

Recently, I received a letter from Sr. Leah Nyamaitho, a missionary Sister working in Central Kenya in East Africa. There, she is in charge of the Amukura Orphanage — a facility which provides food, clothing, shelter, education, and care for orphaned children ranging in age from newborns to those who are approaching teenage years. While a baby is sometimes brought to the orphanage by parents too poor to care for the child, the overwhelming majority of these little ones have lost their parents to illness.

“The number of children coming to us is increasing constantly,” Sr. Leah writes. “Occasionally a child will be adopted, but even when this happens — because the adopting families are usually very poor — they still need our help in making sure that the child gets the food, clothing, medical care and other basic necessities that each human being needs. Even after these children are adopted, we still remain vital to the lives of these little ones.”

“Many people cannot imagine the difficulty of the challenge in constantly having to get enough food to feed the children,” she continues. “And because of their age — and the fact that many of them come to us undernourished or malnourished — we must ensure that each child receives proper nutrition — healthy food. Without it, they will suffer . . . stunted growth, vulnerability to illness and disease, poor cognitive development. It is an incredible challenge.”

“Currently, we rely on the support of various groups to help us get enough food to provide for the orphans,” Sr. Leah explains. “But we really need to find a steady, reliable food source. To this end, we have begun building a fish farm that will allow us not only to raise fish for the children to eat, but we will be able to earn income by selling fish to the nearby communities as well.”

“We have completed a study to make sure that everything will work as we hope. We have also begun digging the pond and will need to drill for a water source. It is a major project and a huge undertaking, but having a reliable source of nutritional protein for the boys and girls at the orphanage will ensure them a healthy, more promising future. Will you help us complete the project?” As I read Sr. Leah’s letter, I could not help but think about the plight of children like those in Sr. Leah’s orphanage. I also imagined the difference we could make in the lives of these little ones if we — you and I — worked together to let them know that they are not alone . . . that they have not been forgotten . . . to let them know that they will not go hungry.

Will you join us in reaching out to the children at Amukura Orphanage in Central Kenya — and other children who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition? There are several ways you can help here in this country! First, the next time you are grocery shopping at your local supermarket, purchase a few extra items — canned goods, flour, dry cereal — and drop them off at your local church or food bank for distribution to needy families. You could also ask your church or community organization to sponsor a free “Sunday breakfast” and invite low or modest income families. I am also hoping that you will send a donation to help the children that Sr. Leah wrote about in her letter.

While I am praying that we can raise at least $32,000 to help the Amukura Orphanage and other projects helping children throughout East Africa, please know that any amount you can send will help those who are suffering. Whether your gift is $25 or $2,500, the most important thing we can do is to join together to let these little ones know that we care . . . that they are loved.